Behaviour Support 101_2

cropped-1b-charlos-cove-a3.jpg

Last up we defined “Behaviour Support” and looked at behaviours of concern. The key insight was relationship – all behaviours of concern are relational. “Concern” is about the people who relate AND the person with behaviours.

This round we look at the “WHY BOTHER” of things. Let’s begin with a “Demystify Me Moment.”

Demystify Me #2

Behaviour Support does not exist in a vacuum. All behaviour support happens in familial, social, community, legal, legislative national, and international policy contexts.

Go figure! No way! But yes… this is true.

Here are a few of the basic human rights involved in behaviour support practice in families, communities, and nations. These come directly out of international, national, and state based policy and practice standards.

Every person has the right to:

  • Dignity and respect
  • Live in and be part of a community
  • Realise their individual potential and capacity for physical, social, emotional,  intellectual, psychological, and spiritual development
  • Access services on an equal footing to others in society that support a reasonable quality of life
  • Choose their own lifestyle and to have access to information
  • Participate in decisions that affect their lives and future
  • Receive services in a way that results in least restriction of personal rights and opportunities and human freedoms
  • Address any grievance or complaint without fear or recrimination from service providers including fear of the discontinuation of services
  • Protection from neglect, abuse, exploitation, and harrassment

 

Citation:

Behaviour Support: Policy and Practice Manual Part 1, NSW Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care, 2009

Related Articles

Interview with Dr Joseph Randolph Bowers

This interview was recorded by a colleague who wanted to remain unnamed. They gathered this information to share in their organisation. Dr Bowers, may I…

Spiritual Values and Behaviour Support

At first glance and broadly speaking, specialist behaviour support within the NDIS and Australian context is based in western secular science and particularly with insights…

Behaviour Support and Counselling Psychotherapy

In many western countries, Behaviour support is traditionally the domain of disability support services that evolved over several generations from the days when families supported…

Receiving NDIS clinical services during the coronovirus covid-19 behaviour support and counselling therapies – a new book launch!

Well before the health outbreak of Covid-19 we were taking steps to move our service model into telehealth methods. It just happened that when we…

Key Factors in Sexual Identity and Behaviour: Taking An Integrative Middle Path

After reviewing new studies of 2016 I confirm three factors linked to sexual behavior and orientation. Genetic. Neurobiological developmental. Environmental social. Not much has changed…