Search

Ability Therapy Specialists Pty Ltd

Individuals, Couples, Families, Children ~ NDIS Registered Provider of Behaviour Support, Counselling Therapies with Creative Arts, Rehabilitation, Employment Job Readiness, Paediatric Early Childhood Intervention ~ Serving Armidale, New England, NSW, Australia and Online

Tag

Tamworth

Specialist Behaviour Support

NDIA Commission Lauch 1 July 2018

The new financial year brings new government oversight of behaviour support. In NSW where we are based, the state system has now fully transitioned (more or less) to the new national system.

This means that disability service providers will face new regulations and standards for behaviour support practice. The NDIA Commission’s new website just launched provides the detailed legislative instruments that will guide and direct upcoming changes and management of behaviour support as well as other functions of governance across the sector.

Disability service providers until now have been managing within a transitional environment. For the past five or so years, this context includes the disbanding of state based agencies like the Department of Ageing Disability and Homecare. In the absence of state based leadership, disability non-gov organisations have been responsible to govern behaviour support policy and practice still under the state established guidelines. Effectively, many organisations have struggled in the wake of NDIS transitions where due to funding shortages they may have let go of staff, not had resources to hire behaviour support practitioners for review of cases, and not been able to maintain independent oversight of clinical services through restrictive practices analysis, authorisation, and review.

In all likelihood, most multi-service option organisations will be doing the catch up, with many people waiting on clinical reviews, and many more individuals carrying old and outdated behaviour support plans. These plans, and the ideally holistic and generative clinical oversight that they represent, are the foundation of positive person centred behaviour support practice.

Alongside, NSW has a history of major investments in capacity building across the disability sector. For example, for over a decade past, Stronger Together reforms established behaviour support practices across the state and offered skills training to NGOs across the sector. Also parallel, the current reality on the ground appears to suggest that the disability NGO sector cannot sustain behaviour support practices without significant independent input by clinicians and specialists. Such expertise tends to be rare, particularly in rural Australia.

The reforms ahead will be interesting to say the least. NDIA Commission led reforms will need to provide vital sector wide leadership as well as provide a conduit for seasoned clinical advice. In saying this, we acknowledge that behaviour support policy and practice are a backbone to the disability services sector – and have held an historical and key society wide leadership role in the spread of positive behaviour support practices and standards.

Where individuals have behaviours of concern, these often touch on every other aspect of life, lifestyle, health, relationships, and community participation. As a field that represents fundamental human rights to dignity and fair treatment, positive behaviour support standards represent key international and national guidelines. The NDIS and now its Commission has a key role in Australia to forward these standards for the wellbeing of Australians.

Restrictive Practices and NDIS Part 2

Essentially, when the states hand over certain controls of the disability sector to the #NDIS, existing standards for safety, dignity, and human rights once covered by state policies will translate to national standards. For example, the NSW Behaviour Support Policy and Practice Guide.

The assumption is that existing standards will actually remain if not become subject to increasing quality assurance measures. Over time standards may also raise and in ways this is already happening. No one would suggest standards may fall or become less.

If anything the NDIS vision indicates a rather comprehensive overhaul of disability service standards quite unlike anything Australia has seen in past.

This development may be combined with other changes across the sector, and influenced by external forces like legal and community expectations, leading to higher standards of care and professionalism among disability service organizations.

The role of the Disability Support Worker is due for reappraisal. We often consider the DSW role as defined so far by common sense as quite inadequate to the tasks and demands of the job. We see a new role emerging in practice where staff gain greater skills across a range of areas particularly within mental health support. Something we have called a Disability Support Clinician.

In similar ways we are seeing the disability sector slowly shifting away from one stop shops, orgs offering everything under one umbrella, toward a greater emphasis on multi-professional input and collaboration. Naturally no one org can do nor specialise in everything and often by trying to do too much orgs become top heavy and inflexible. In these settings behaviour support and access to counselling and other therapeutic services often become overlooked if not avoided for the simple fact that therapeutic work often involves question of the status quo.

Not at all beside the point, we are well into this discussion and we have not even defined key terms like #restrictivepractices and behaviour support. The reason I have not looked at the practical details yet is that our current situation in Australia demands seeing the big picture within the transition to full NDIS jurisdiction. Dispelling a few key myths. And setting the stage for clearly looking at standards for behaviour support.

As you might guess this article is turned into a mini series… a bit of a drama really… but a discussion that actually often involves extremely important values. For example?

Health. Safety. Individual and staff rights. Human rights more broadly but often in cases where maintenance and oversight of these rights becomes critically important. Dignity and duty. Freedom and responsibility. Ethics and standards of care… and these are only a few of the values applied in #behavioursupport and the closely related field of #mentalhealth.

Insidious Travel Distance, NDIS Behaviour Support, and Regional Australia

Access, choice, and control in regional Australia and across northern NSW relies on stronger travel policies that take large distances into account.

For example, in the New England North West of NSW it is extremely common to rely on services by travelling from one regional centre to another – especially to see a specialist service.

Case in point, it is common for Inverell people to shop in Armidale, 1.5 hrs away, and to go to Tamworth, 2.5 hrs drive, for other essential services not available in Inverell. Armidale people go to Inverell as well. In fact people rely on neighboring regional centres such that they form part of local identities much like residents of large bush estates rely on neighbours who may live far away. But then again distance is rated differently in the bush.

Many services are sought across regional centres but health and allied health services commonly require a great deal of travel.

It is also more common for professionals and specialists to travel in regional Australia. Of course we think of the flying doctors. Nurses also travel extensively. But this is very true for mental health and disability specialist therapists. The latter is all the more relevant for people with disabilities because therapists often prefer to see these clients in their own environment where there is greater chance to observe natural functioning without the added stress for the client that comes from travel to a foreign or clinical setting.

Over the past many years behaviour specialists have travelled across northern NSW under state government funded initiatives because that policy acknowledged the incidious nature of regional travel as a vital life line for regional Australian’s access to specialist disability supports. The policy also followed best practice in evidence based outcomes. Visiting people with disabilities in their own homes or community generally attaches better outcomes.

Many feel the NDIS has not yet generated an adequate funding policy for regional Australia, which does not fall into the remote policy definitions.

What exists so far may not reflect the reasonable and necessary needs of regional Australians. Naturally for the new Scheme existing policy arises from an urban centered model, and applies notions from the urban-based health sector, without acknowledging the critical and historical differences the disability and regional sectors present that either make service provision viable or fall flat on its face.

To reduce if not eliminate this layer of travel and service quality support to regional Australia is to effectively reduce access to specialist behaviour support and other therapies.

Such services may not ever exist in smaller regional centres. Travel will always be an issue.

It is simply not viable to set up a clinical service in most areas of northern NSW. This is unlikely to change in the near future.

This means travel across region to access specialists or for practitioners to visit clients will likely remain the norm.

In the same light, certain NDIS services will not likely expand with the market due to certain geographic, regional, and economic reasons, and will require policy initiatives to support regional access. Other methods will need to be employed to maintain the limited number of viable independent specialist services the region can sustain as a market niche.

Add to this discussion the fact that the former state model saw three tiered services with local practitioners, specialist behaviour support supplied regionally, and an added statewide senior specialist backup system, networked across levels. The current reality in NSW is by no means matching pre Scheme measures.

People who need a service are often encouraged to go back to their Support Coordinator, NDIS Planner or Local Area Coordinator and put up a change of circumstances review.

Sad as this is for a family in need, it is the only way the Scheme will register these needs, and eventually come up with better ways to measure allocations for behaviour support or other therapies.

Having said all of this, in our opinion the NDIS is an impressive vision and historic accomplishment. We are only on the cusp of NSW formal transfer this July, and yet so much progress is evidenced already.

As vital as this remains for so many, progress so far has a way to go before the sector can actually sustain services for regional Australians and for high needs complex cases. Even for those others who require periodic specialist supports the current system is falling short.

But we live in hope.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: